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The French Labor Day

The French Labor Day

The French Labor Day

While the United States celebrates Labor Day on the first Monday of September-- whatever day that may fall on, France celebrates their Labor Day on May 1st.


The French Labor Day, or La Fête du Travail, was originally known as Fête internationale des Travailleurs, or International Worker’s Day. This holiday was first internationally recognized in 1890 and was dedicated to the working class. 

 

Prior to the Labor Day celebration, May 1st was known for centuries as the day when winter turned to spring.

 

During World War II the name changed to Fête du Travail et de la Concorde sociale, or Work and Social Unity Day. Until, finally, the nation settled upon La Fête du Travail in 1941, when it was made a public holiday. 


Prior to the Labor Day celebration, May 1st was known for centuries as the day when winter turned to spring. This day was known as May Day and was a time where everyone showed appreciation for their loved ones.


Since 1561, the Lily of the Valley flower has been a recognized symbol of May Day, or now the French Labor Day. This is because the then reigning King Charles IX had received the flower as a gift on May 1st and decided to give each lady in his court a single Lily of the Valley. And the rest is history.


While the gifting of lilies started as a yearly tradition in the court, it quickly became popular all throughout France, where people would give bouquets of lilies to their family members. 


Still to this day, in France, the Lily of the Valley is known as a sign of appreciation to whoever they are given to on Labor Day.


Now, if you were to visit France on May 1st, businesses would be closed and you would see families together picking the precious Lily of the Valley.

 

Warmly,

 

Calisson Toys Team

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